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Tag Archives: token

My findings as of late

13 Sep

Although I haven’t been posting lately, I have been able to get out and dig a thing or two.

I have been concentrating on a particular spot at a particular park with the long term goal in mind of eventually hitting it with a P.I. machine or maybe even with a BlissTool. To that end, I have been digging up all targets and I am now left with only tiny pieces of foil, which the Deus hits hard at very impressive depths. Still, I continue to be amazed that after almost a year of hunting this spot, I still find interesting objects there.

A couple of weeks ago I was very surprised to find this Wichita Transportation Co. token at about 6 inches down.

Old Wichita trolley token

Good for one fare

About 20 yards away from this one, on a different day, I found an even earlier version of this token from when the company was called The Wichita Railroad and Light Co. Unfortunately, I misplaced that picture.

At a different park, I found yet another dateless Buffalo nickel. I don’t get tired of them though!

Buffalo nickel

I love them Buffs

And speaking of nickels, one of the things I love to do with the Deus is to turn it into a nickel machine by changing the tones and by using notching. There are countless nickels in our city parks just waiting for me to dig them up.

Jefferson nickels

This is becoming a common occurrence

And I continue my search for more gold even as my friends Patton and Steveouke are cleaning up on the silver coins.

Fall is here and I should be able to get out more often. Stay tuned!

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When the bullet hits the bone

26 Aug

I went metal detecting this morning with my XP Deus metal detector.

I hit an old park for two hours and after countless pieces of foil, I decided to change venues. I returned to my old tried-and-true spot at the old trashy park.

Right away I hit a transportation token. Just when I think I’ve gotten the last one from there, I find another one! I am not complaining though, I love them.

old Wichita trolley token

They read as foil on my detector

Then I found a bullet. I find bullets all the time but this one is a little creepy. Look at the blunt end where the bullet hit something. It sure looks like the pattern shattered bone makes! Maybe I am just seeing things.

fired bullet

Sure looks like this one hit something

The next thing I found, besides the countless pull tabs and foil, was a shot shell. I don’t get excited about shot shells anymore but this one is in such good shape! According to Cartridge Corner (see links on the right), this Winchester shot shell was made from 1884 to 1894. Niiiice.

shot gun shell bottom

Like it was dropped yesterday!

Last, I found a locket. I don’t know how old it may be but it opens. I will clean it later and try to open it to see what’s in it.

Old heart-shaped locket

What’s inside?

I am happy I got to hunt for a few hours. We finally got some decent rain and the ground is a joy to dig.

Thank you for looking!

A token kind of day

19 Jul

I spent two hours very early this morning metal detecting with the XP Deus metal detector. I returned to the site where I found my very first ever trade token and I found two more of the same except the number in the back was different. Then I found two additional but different tokens and a numbered lead seal.

This leads me to believe that this may have been the site of a store at some time in the past. I found no coins though, at least not yet.

various old tokens

A fistful of tokens

Trade token

The numbers on the reverse are different

Trade token obverse

This one is in much better shape than the last one

The two other tokens are in poor shape. I have seen the Palmolive token many times before so I know what it is for (a cake of soap). The Ranch El Campo token is a different story. I’ve never seen one before.

I found other things at the site including a copper spoon that I broke while extracting it from the hard, dry ground and a number of house parts made of brass and copper.

I still have hopes of finding coins there but I may wait for more rain (we got some rain today but not nearly enough).

Thank you for looking!

The Deus rocks and that’s no bull

15 Jul

I got to go metal detecting this afternoon with the XP Deus metal detector.

I hit several places with no luck until I decided to revisit a place I had not been able to detect due to Electromagnetic Interferece (EMI) from a large power plant nearby. The Deus was only a little chatty but the noise in no way interfered with the signals.

I was using the Deus Fast program due to the large amounts of old house debris at the site. I detected under a tree and right away I got a nice signal with a VDI in the mid 80’s. About three inches down I got this really cool pendant:

Bull Durham tobacco logo pendant

Bull Durham

If you look really carefully, you can see the words Bull Durham on the pendant. The bull looked old timey so I looked it up on the Web. The bull is the logo of the Bull Durham Tobacco company. The logo was common around the 1920’s.

Bull Durham tobacco ad

The bull logo is a dead match for the pendant

The back of the pendant says 14K gold plated but most of the gold is gone from the pendant.

I continued hunting around the same tree and I got another signal in the mid 80’s. This time only about two inches down I found my very first Trade Token ever!

Trade token obverse

Good for 5 cents in trade

Trade token reverse

16259

I think this is really cool but there is no identifying information on the token other than the number 16259 on the reverse. Hmmmmm…

I found pictures of similar tokens with the same ornamental elements from the early 1900’s mostly from Wichita tobacco stores and bowling alley’s.

Last, before I left, I got another signal around that tree and it was a nice quarter signal. With visions of Barber quarters dancing in my head, I happily dug a six inch deep hole and I found this brooch at the bottom:

Ornate brooch

I was tired and it was time to go home but you can bet I am returning to grid the area. This area is the site of a very old neighborhood that was razed in the mid 1970’s and it is now part of a park.

Thank you for looking!

The Deus and the Iron Pit

11 Jul

I took the XP Deus metal detector to the Iron Pit. The Iron Pit has become the proving grounds for all my metal detectors.

The Deus p-owned the Iron Pit!

I have said that I have hunted the Iron Pit until there were no signals left except ferrous signals. Then I took the Tesoro Compadre and was floored that I was able to get a few non-ferrous targets out of the Iron Pit.

Well today, after work, I hit the Iron Pit with the Deus. In essence and for all practical purposes, the Iron Pit has become a live site again, with LOTS of non-ferrous signals.

various metal objects

Iron Pit, p-owned!

I even managed to get a silver earring!

Not pictured are about a dozen pull tabs and beaver tails that were invisible to my other detectors.

silver earring

This was so loud and clear, a deaf man could have found it.

Getting non-ferrous targets from an iron-infested site with the Deus was like taking candy from a baby.

I used the Deus Fast program that came installed from the factory. I am so excited at the prospect of gridding the Iron Pit with the Deus and seeing what amazing goodies I missed before.

Oh, and I only took the targets that were easy to extract. I left many signals that were deep and will wait for me and the Sampson T-handle digger.

Thank you for looking!

Square token – **UPDATED**

10 Jul

I found an interesting square token with my XP Deus metal detector this morning.

It is made of brass and it is exactly 2cm x 2cm (approx. 3/4 inch) or about the size of a U.S. nickel coin.  The fact that the measurements are exact in metric units makes me suspect that this is not a U.S. token (metrication is voluntary in the U.S.).

**UPDATE** I was right. This token appears to be a German transportation token. Many thanks to Stevouke for steering me in the right direction. Although I could not find an exact match, I found many other examples that matched the style of the this token and all were transportation tokens from Germany. This one could be old.****

I find it interesting that the value (?) of this token is 2 1/2.

square brass token

M.K. Hmmmmm….

brass token reverse

About two fitty

Another interesting thing is that the font on the obverse does not match the font on the reverse.

I could not find any information about it on the Web.

At the spot where I found the token, there stood a Girl Scout camp from the 1920’s to the 1980’s but the neighborhood around it dates as far back as 1900. I’ve found several Indian Head cents at the site, as well as a 1901 dog tag.

Thank you for looking!

A very cool token – The mystery of the Iron Pit; revealed!

4 Jun

After work today, I stopped by the Iron Pit for a few minutes of detecting. After digging a number of pull tabs and a very unexpected 1951D wheat cent, I got a very steady foil signal with a target id of 45. I got excited for a minute thinking this may be a gold item but what I dug from the six inch hole was another Wichita transportation token.

I was happy to find the token anyway and put it in my pocket. Soon after, I turned the AT Pro off and went home. After supper, I went to take a picture of the wheat and the bus token and it was only then that I realized how cool the token really was.

I was staring right at a Wichita rail system token! Early on Wichita’s history, the city had a rail car service that took the citizenry to and fro. I had read about this service while researching various spots in the city but this is the first time I found a token from those days.

Wichita Railroad & Light Co. token

Before there were buses…

With this find, the mystery of the Iron Pit may have been solved. Since finding my honey hole last Summer, I’ve wondered why there is so much iron at the site. There are also lots of slag, coal, square nails, and rusted iron foil. I had suspected that some kind of structure may have stood at the site but it never occurred to me that one of the railways from the Wichita Railroad service may have run through the Iron Pit!

According to my research, the Wichita Street Railway Co. was formed before 1890. That year, the company adopted the name Wichita Street Railway Co. From 1900 to 1933 the company went by the name of the Wichita Railroad and Light Co. and it is from this period that my token comes from. Cool!
In 1933, the street cars were discontinued and the Wichita Transportation Co. was born and it operated until 1966.

If there was a railway running through the Iron Pit, that would explain all the metal junk there. Now I am going to work really hard at finding a Wichita Railway Co. token!

Super cool!

Thank you for looking!

More stuff from the Iron Pit

28 May

I went out hunting this morning for a couple of hours. I decided to try the honey hole with the AT Pro and the 5x8DD coil. First thing I did, was to change the name of the honey hole to The Iron Pit. Second thing I did was to lower the sensitivity on the AT Pro down to three bars. I did this to try to cope with the large amounts of iron there.

So the idea was to dig all foil and pull tab signals and any wayward high tone. After two hours, I had dug 47 signals and only two were high tones: a 1917 wheat that I got only after I had removed the rusty nail that was masking it and a bullet. The other 45 signals were all mid tones with the great majority of them being foil. I ended up with about 7 round pull tabs and a bunch of assorted metal bits. I was just commenting to another hunter, Stevouke, that I was surprised the Iron Pit still continued to yield cool stuff.

1917 Lincoln cent and two transportation tokens

After almost a year of hunting this spot, I still find stuff

I don’t know when the Wichita Transportation Corporation started in Wichita but the newspaper has an article that says that in 1929, the company carried 18,000,000 fares. That means that there ought to be millions of these tokens laying around!  The Iron Pit goes back to the late 1800’s.

Wichita Transportation Corporation token

A relic of Wichita’s past

Wichita Transportation Token

When I started riding the bus in 1980, these tokens were no longer in use.

1917 Lincoln cent obverse

They dropped this guy back in the 20’s I think

Last, I found this tag just under the ground. It is a tag for Royal Swan ribbon. This was popular in the 40’s. This particular ribbon was woven edge rayon. The term Rayon was first used in 1924 and rayon was first made in the U.S. in 1910 although it was patented in Britain in 1894.

Royal Swan ribbon tag

A product of Burlington Mills

There is a very interesting article about Burlington Mills here.

All in all I had a great time hunting the Iron Pit. I am going to wait until it rains before I hunt there again because digging there today was like digging through concrete.

Thank you for looking!

My First Good Luck Token (or Hold Me Closer Tiny Dancer)

6 May

I haven’t had much luck lately on my hunts. Granted, I’ve cut back on my detecting quite a bit, but still, what does a man have to do around here to get some silver?!

So Saturday morning I met Steveouke and Silversmith45 from the Friendly Metal Detecting Forum at a grade school that was built in 1917. We found nothing so we moved on to some empty lots around the school. I hunted with my AT Pro with the 5x8DD coil. Aside from a bunch of clad, I found this Steffen’s Ice Cream Co. Good Luck Token.

Steffen's Dairy token

Came up between a quarter and a half dollar on the Pro.

Token-reverse

No swastika on this good luck token

The token was a little over six inches deep.

The Steffen Ice Cream Company was founded in Wichita in 1899 but was then known as the Citizen’s Ice Company. In 1903 the company changed its name to become the Steffen-Bretch Ice and Ice Cream Company. The founder of the business, Nicholas Steffen, was killed by a train while him and another man attempted to cross a railroad crossing on June 8, 1910.

I haven’t been able to date the token. I’ve found a couple of examples here and there but the best I can do for now is to tell you that at some point, the Steffen’s Ice Cream co. stopped making ice cream and this token obviously dates to before that date. Because a swastika was not used on the design of the token, I suspect this token was made after WWII, since by then, Hitler and his goons had given the swastika a negative connotation (prior to that, the swastika was a good luck symbol as well as a symbol for a sun wheel).

But I could be wrong.

Later on Saturday, while running an errand, I stopped by another elementary school and hunted for a little while. This school opened in the mid fifties and it is schedule to shut down this year. I found some clad there as well as a tiny ballerina pendant that read as foil on my AT Pro (VDI of 40). The reason why I dug this signal is that it was noticeably different than any other foil signal I’ve ever heard on the Pro. This one was silky and ’round’. I believe this is what someone else was talking about when they said that gold signals were softer than pull tab signals and foil signals on the AT Pro. I hope to run into this kind of signal again and hopefully there will be gold at the bottom of the hole!

small pendant in shape of ballerina

Tiny dancer 4 inches down.

Thank you for looking!

War nickel. I love these guys!

26 Jan

After work, I stopped at the old trashy park (Riverside) for a quick 30 minute hunt. I found a couple of No Cash Value tokens right away, then I hit a signal that could have been anything really, but my V3i said the thing was 6 inches deep so in spite of the signal being broken up and ugly, I dug it. And boy! Am I glad I did!

Generations of hunters missed this coin but I didn’t 😀

1944 D Jefferson nickel freshly dug

Freshly dug

1944 D Jefferson nickel obverse

A little cleaner

Reverse 1944 D nickel

The Big D

This is only the third war nickel I have ever dug up and the first D mint mark.

The last signal I got was a very iffy, here-gone-and-here-again signal. The park is carpeted with iron and it makes for a very interesting hunt. Anyway, I know the park now and I am beginning to know when a signal may be a coin. So I went for it and at a little over five inches deep, I found the 1964 Memorial penny.

It gives me lots of hope that I may find my Seated coin in this park. I know it’s out there, semi-masked by iron and giving a signal only I can love.

Coins and tokens

30 minutes in rusty iron hell

Thank you for looking!